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21 Oct

New Pool Fencing Law

New Pool Fencing Law

New pool fencing law passed

Parliament has today passed improved laws to better protect children from drowning in swimming pools while also making the requirements more practical and enforceable, Building and Housing Minister Dr Nick Smith says.

“The law change in 1987 requiring swimming pools to be fenced reduced the accidental drowning of children from more than 100 per decade to about 20 per decade. The measures in the Building (Pools) Amendment Bill take effect on 1 January 2017 and are expected to save an additional six young children’s lives per decade.

“The most important safety improvement in this Bill is the compulsory nationwide requirement for all swimming pools to be inspected and certified every three years. This addresses the problem that most drownings today occur because gates no longer close, fences have not been maintained or other changes have occurred that enable children to get access. Half of inspected pools have been found to be non-compliant, exposing children to risk.

 

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16 Sep

Special Housing Areas

Special Housing Areas
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01 Jul

Carport Exemption

Carport Exemption

Building Consent Exemptions

A change to building consent exemptions means new carports, whether free-standing or attached, do not require a building consent from 30 June 2016.

The exemption applies to free-standing or attached carports that are:

•   on ground level

•   no greater than 20 square metres.

 

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13 May

Earthquake-prone Buildings Act 2016

Earthquake-prone Buildings Act 2016

Building (Earthquake-prone Buildings) Amendment Act 2016

The new system for managing earthquake-prone buildings is outlined in the Building (Earthquake-prone Buildings) Amendment Act. This new legislation addresses recommendations from the Canterbury Earthquakes Royal Commission and the findings of a comprehensive review by the Government. It also reflects a number of public submissions on the proposed system.

New Zealand will be categorised into three areas of low, medium and high seismic risk. National timeframes for territorial authorities to identify earthquake-prone buildings and deadlines for building owners to remediate earthquake-prone buildings will be set relative to their location and level of seismic risk.

 

Public consultation on the final form of the new regulations and the EPB methodology will take place later this year.

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